Projects

Each year, the Praxis Program fellows take on a particular project to exercise what they have learned throughout the year. Some projects have spanned cohorts, while others were executed in the span of a single. Some projects explored extant vaporware projects in the Lab, while others were inspired by experiments with a more freeform prompt. Explore the list below, presented in chronological order, for more information about each project. Each cohort blogs their progress on the Scholars’ Lab blog, where you can find more writings about the projects as they have developed. Further publications, writings, or awards are so noted.


Prism

Prism is a tool for collaborative interpretation of texts. Imagined as the digital instantiation of a vaporware game that was played in the Scholars' Lab and SpecLab, the site allows users to upload documents for a group to interpret along various interpretive axes. The tool has seen significant use in K-12 classrooms. More information can be found at the project's homepage.
2011-2012
  • Alex Gil
  • Brooke Lestock
  • Lindsay O'Connor
  • Sarah Storti
  • Annie Swafford
  • Ed Triplett
2012-2013
  • Shane Lin
  • Claire Maiers
  • Cecilia Márquez
  • Gwen Nally
  • Chris Peck
  • Brandon Walsh
Publications
  • Crowdsourcing Individual Interpretations: Between Microtasking and Macrotasking,” Brandon Walsh; Claire Maiers; Gwen Nally; Jeremy Boggs; Literary and Linguistic Computing 2014; doi: 10.1093/llc/fqu030.
  • “Prism,” under the “Poetry” keyword in Digital Pedagogy in the Humanities: Concepts, Models, and Experiments.
  • Walsh, Brandon, 'Prism and Reading's Shape,' in Pataphysics Then & Now, (under submission, Penn State UP).

Ivanhoe

Expanding on an old piece of SpecLab activity, Ivanhoe offers a space to create gaming environments for collaborative interpretation. Built as a WordPress theme, the tool asks users to contibute a text, adopt different roles, and then collectively reinvent that document by writing alternative narratives. Think of it as collaborative fan fiction meets exegesis - by playing out the roles of characters in new ways, Ivanhoe asks users to make interventions. More information can be found at the project's homepage.
2013-2014
  • Scott Bailey
  • Elizabeth Fox
  • Veronica Ikeshoji-Orlati
  • Stephanie Kingsley
  • Zachary Stone
  • Francesca Tripodi
2014-2015
  • Amy Boyd
  • Swati Chawla
  • Andrew Ferguson
  • Joris Gjata
  • Jennifer Grayburn
  • Steven Lewis

ClockWork

This year's cohort was asked simply to think about time in some way, and the result is ClockWork, an experiment in how temporal data might be turned into sonic artifacts, or sonified. The site offers several different sonifications of its own, serves as a platform for teaching sonification to others, and focuses on the programming language SuperCollider. More information can be found at the project's homepage.
2015-2016
  • James Ascher
  • Bremen Donovan
  • Ethan Reed
  • Gillet Rosenblith
  • Rachel Devorah
  • Lydia Warren
Publications
  • This team experimented used the Praxis site as a blog and memo site. You can find their notes here.

Dash-Amerikan

Like the previous cohort, this year's group took the concept of time as their provocation, but they took it in a wildly different direction. Reflecting broadly on how the Kardashian family pervades our present moment, Dash-Amerikan uses variety of digital humanities methodologies to interrogate their social media ecologies. Assembling and topic modeling a vast archive of twitter data and episode transcripts, the cohort produced a lengthy digital essay that sits at the intersections of media studies, digital humanities, and public humanities. More information can be found at the project's homepage.
2016-2017
  • Jordan Buysse
  • Alicia Caticha
  • Alyssa Collins
  • Justin Greenlee
  • Sarah McEleney
  • Joseph Thompson
Awards
  • First place, GSAS Huskey Research Exhibition, UVA, 2017
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